Hit a BACKHEALER class today and experienced a new instructor to me, Matt. He had some great visuals for the breathing part & we got right into the groove. Then when the ballwork started he introduced “The Wave”. Think: Intention! Active & Engaged Breathing!

So, say you are lying on the ball working psoasland. You take a deep long breath in that starts in your chest & fills your lungs all the way to the skin on your upper back. Continue breathing in as you fill your lungs mid-back to lower back — all the way to the point your body is resting on the ball. Hold that last stretch of breath in — then with a slight curve of the body into the ball — release the breath out as you physically follow your breath back up to your mid-back, upper back, neck and out your nose. It’s a wave of breath and body towards the ball, around it, HOLD — and follow the wave back towards your upper chest & nose and OUT. Full intentional breath undulating in & down to the ball. Full intentional undulating release out. Gradually zeroing in: focusing on movement in small, say 1/2″, increments as you try to follow the sinuous curve of the wave. The first side of the body I did this way felt great & it was very easy to focus while being so intentional with the body and breath like this. But it was on the second side that a true rhythm was formed with the wave action & it was an amazing experience. As Matt described  — like a massage! It felt like there was more space between all my vertebrae & ribs and reminded me of bellydancing (though much more subtle and SLOWER) with my spine and hips moving like a snake over the ball.

Highly recommended!

Yvonne – A prairie raised renaissance woman with a passion for expansion. Planning to live to 92, so smack in the middle of things and taking action.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Great Visual Matt, thanks!!!

  2. I was telling my student climbers to climb as if they were a wave…right up my ways of moving/breathing. Thanks

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Pelvic wall – 1st muscles to contract when inhaling

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